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Hello, Hello? 5 Tips for Improving Your Welcome Autoresponders – Part 2

In my last post, I covered why it’s important to have an autoresponder set up on all your forms. You know it’s your best chance for introducing yourself and making a really good first impression, but maybe you need some help coming up with ideas for making that first interaction a memorable experience. If so, today’s post is for you!

Personalization is Key

My top tip is to personalize. Now, you may be thinking “yeah, but I’ve only got their name, the form they signed up on, and a dropdown response for ‘I am interested in this product’, how can I possibly personalize that?!” Well, personalization runs in both directions: your personality as a sender of that email and the personality of the person you’re writing to. So, why not give your marketing some personality? What kind of company are they interacting with, what do you want people to walk away with as their first impression of your brand? Spend some time really figuring out what sort of tone you want your emails to have and use that to dictate your email style.

Commit to Frequency

Next, be upfront about what frequency of email they can expect to receive, and stick to it. If I can expect to receive an email a week with your top offers on craft supplies, then don’t send me an offer every day. Tell me what I’m going to be getting, give me the option of opting up or opting down through an email preference center, and be consistent. As an added bonus, by letting me know when I can expect to receive email and at what frequency, I know to expect that email and can let you know if I don’t receive it. That’s a pretty big bonus from a deliverabilty perspective, as it gives you insight into how your mail may be performing at certain ISPs!

Be Clear with Your Unsubscribe

Yes, really. Sometimes, I’m filling out your form solely so I can get ahold of that whitepaper for some kind of research I’m doing. I don’t care about anything else your company does. That may come off as harsh, but it’s better to let people know exactly how to opt out in your autoresponder and how easy it is to do so, rather than having them report spam later because they were never interested in the first place. It may seem counterintuitive from a marketing perspective, but it’s okay to let people unsubscribe as opposed to reporting spam. It’s okay to let go, there are plenty of other prospects you can be focusing your time and marketing efforts on.

Send Recipients Back to Your Site

In the most recent form I signed up on, I received a tremendous autoresponder that included links to other recipes I may be interested in, based on the recipe I downloaded. It was an excellent way to bring me back to the site and keep me interested and engaged in the other content they had to offer, content I had overlooked initially. By getting me interested in other parts of the site, I’m less likely to forget I’d opted in (and with fifteen tabs open on the same site, you bet I’m not forgetting!) and am more likely to open their future emails.

Tell Recipients How to Whitelist

The truth is, telling someone how to make sure they receive your email can be really awkward, but it’s an important thing to include. Gmail and Microsoft Clutter aren’t perfect, and sometimes email I actually want can get lost in the shuffle. It’s helpful to include a small piece on how to whitelist your address in different email clients, so your email is more likely to stand out in my inbox.

Did I miss any tips you’ve found particularly helpful for your autoresponder emails? Tweet me @holobachgirl with your thoughts!